Jina Gelder – Foxiness

 

 

 

 

 

Daryl Feril – DoA Illustrations

 

 

Bill Magazine – Ink Illustrations

 

 

 

Carsten Witte – Plant Photography

Metamorphose

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Angelica Dass – Pantone Skin Tone

 

 

 

 

A wonderful project from Spanish artist Angelica Dass: a series of photographic portraits in which she sets her subjects against a background of a specific PANTONE color that matches his or her skin tone.

Emma Coats – Pixar Story Rules

Pixar story artist Emma Coats has tweeted a series of “story basics” over the past month and a half — guidelines that she learned from her more senior colleagues on how to create appealing stories:

#1: You admire a character for trying more than for their successes.

#2: You gotta keep in mind what’s interesting to you as an audience, not what’s fun to do as a writer. They can be v. different.

#3: Trying for theme is important, but you won’t see what the story is actually about til you’re at the end of it. Now rewrite.

#4: Once upon a time there was ___. Every day, ___. One day ___. Because of that, ___. Because of that, ___. Until finally ___.

#5: Simplify. Focus. Combine characters. Hop over detours. You’ll feel like you’re losing valuable stuff but it sets you free.

#6: What is your character good at, comfortable with? Throw the polar opposite at them. Challenge them. How do they deal?

#7: Come up with your ending before you figure out your middle. Seriously. Endings are hard, get yours working up front.

#8: Finish your story, let go even if it’s not perfect. In an ideal world you have both, but move on. Do better next time.

#9: When you’re stuck, make a list of what WOULDN’T happen next. Lots of times the material to get you unstuck will show up.

#10: Pull apart the stories you like. What you like in them is a part of you; you’ve got to recognize it before you can use it.

#11: Putting it on paper lets you start fixing it. If it stays in your head, a perfect idea, you’ll never share it with anyone.

#12: Discount the 1st thing that comes to mind. And the 2nd, 3rd, 4th, 5th – get the obvious out of the way. Surprise yourself.

#13: Give your characters opinions. Passive/malleable might seem likable to you as you write, but it’s poison to the audience.

#14: Why must you tell THIS story? What’s the belief burning within you that your story feeds off of? That’s the heart of it.

#15: If you were your character, in this situation, how would you feel? Honesty lends credibility to unbelievable situations.

#16: What are the stakes? Give us reason to root for the character. What happens if they don’t succeed? Stack the odds against.

#17: No work is ever wasted. If it’s not working, let go and move on – it’ll come back around to be useful later.

#18: You have to know yourself: the difference between doing your best & fussing. Story is testing, not refining.

#19: Coincidences to get characters into trouble are great; coincidences to get them out of it are cheating.

#20: Exercise: take the building blocks of a movie you dislike. How d’you rearrange them into what you DO like?

#21: You gotta identify with your situation/characters, can’t just write ‘cool’. What would make YOU act that way?

#22: What’s the essence of your story? Most economical telling of it? If you know that, you can build out from there.

Bronia Sawyer – Book Sculptures

Bronia Sawyer

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Ian Hobson – Trippy Light Photography (without digital manipulation)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

UK-based photographer Ian Hobson is an expert at all kinds of impressive light art photography. When you first see his images, a collection called Waving Torches at Things, you won’t believe that he creates them directly from his camera without the use of any digital manipulation. But, according to his website, he says, “All images are photographs, straight from the camera. Nothing is added, the only post-processing is conversion of the digital negatives into jpegs.”

Hobson’s complex spectacles of light combine waves, streaks, and swirls to form an image filled with trippy patterns of color. The trick to this work is the use of very long exposures to capture the variety of light streaks that he places in front of the lens. Hobson uses all kinds of light sources to create these unique images, ranging from battery powered, handheld light tubes in all colors, to flaming wool tossed into the air. The final results are incredible designs that will take your breath away! Via My Modern Met.

Matt R Martin – Lifelike and Surreal Portraits

Matt R Martin

Matt R. Martin is a Melbourne artist whose work originates from his love of life drawing and is heavily influenced by film, the representational and the surreal. Via Artist A Day.

10,000 Hits!

Just wanted to give a quick thank you to everyone for getting apk to have over 10,000 hits! That’s awesome!!! Thanks to everyone that loves cool things, especially the followers!

 

Also this…

Gridness

http://gridness.net/

 

 

 

 

 

A Type Lesson

Zoom in here.

 

Alexis Kadonsky – 6,000 Something

A piece I created completely out of push pins… Over 6,000 of them!

To see more of my work, please “Like” my Facebook page and leave me some feedback! Thanks everyone!

 

6,000 Something

Push Pins and Spray Paint

24″ x 24″

 

Support my art! Thanks!

Ana Teresa Fernandez – Lifelike Paintings

Ana Teresa Fernandez

Ablution is a series of paintings that derive from performances that submerges the body into specific sites, addressing rituals of cleansing and maintenance, focusing on gender, labor, sexuality and race. What does it mean to be clean in today’s society? Using water as a metaphor for purity, and playing an ironic dirty twist for ”wetback”, these performances dive into history’s religious transformation from paganism; water as a symbol for fertility and strength, then into Catholicism; washing away our guilt, deconstructing a watered down identity as a bicultural immigrant. No matter how much we try to sculpt our own identities and bodies through repetitive actions, our reflection unto society can always be distorted and broken up through people’s own perceptions. Via Juxtapoz.

Kylie Woon – Surreal Photography

 

 

 

 

Thomas Quinn – Face Reality As It Is

 

Gregor Gaida – Aluminum Boys Destroy Art Gallery Floors

 

 

 

 

 

Gregor Gaida lives and works in Bremen, Germany. His figurative sculptures often depict aggressive, even violent people engaging with eachother under unknown circumstances, as with this pair of mischievous aluminum boys titled Attaboys. Gaida says that he often bases his figures off of images found in magazines and books.

The found footage is often no more than an impulse that is no longer discernible in the further development of the shape. Analogous to photography, my objects are three-dimensional snapshots. The characters are frozen in movement and often cropped along imaginary image borders. I transport the fragmented character of photos into the third dimension. Simultaneously, when dealing with color and options of shaping, painterly characteristics appear. Thus, the life-sized special interventions are formally attributed to sculpture but are equally part of painterly and photographic categories. Via Colossal.

Christopher Hassler – Point of View

Christopher Hassler